Want to Join Me on Our New Culture Journey?

Abundance Accountability Personal leadership Respect

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The Challenge: Lots of people can write about it, but few I know have the experience of architecting, executing, and building an extraordinary culture. I’ve been invited to be the Chief Culture and Transformation Officer at a postsecondary institution, and I’d like to take you along for the ride. This opportunity is unique for me. I’ve led culture transformation in technology, sports, telecommunications, banking and now postsecondary. This is a new sector for me, AND it gives me the ability to do something important by linking education to the rapidly changing world of work. Postsecondary education is going to be disrupted, and I would like to be part of that story in the best possible way.

I’m going to be very transparent and authentic during the ride, while avoiding information that is private and confidential to the college. And of course, this is totally my story and I will not refer to others without their permission. The objective is to share my learnings so that you might consider how to personally make it relevant to your situation.

The First Steps of Our Journey:

It is really important to get people at all levels involved in building the culture transformation plan. This involves establishing a definition, framework, and outline for what an extraordinary culture looks and feels like. It also includes conducting a culture assessment. So, we’re inviting all of the college to “audition” to become culture champions. We will select about 20, take them through a “culture boot camp,” and equip them with an assessment tool. They will then spread out through the college and listen to as many people as possible in a structured way. From there, we will build our execution plan. This first stage is to ignite and listen. We’ll see how this process works and keep you posted.

In parallel, we are facilitating a “purpose and values sprint” with the executive team, along with some other key folks. There is much solid work that’s already been done in this area to date and we’re building off of that progress. This outcome will be instrumental in guiding our culture execution and will connect with the recommendations of our culture champion team. Stay tuned and tag along.

Think Big, Start Small, Act Now.

Lorne

One Millennial View: I’m certainly interested to see how this pans out. I’d like to know what constitutes a “culture bootcamp,” and how the student body and faculty respond/perform. I look forward to hearing more as the journey continues.

– Garrett

Blog 985

Edited and published by Garrett Rubis

Lead In With Lorne – Get a Workout in While You Still Can

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As spring and summer are in the air, and we have a chance to be more active, don’t take it for granted. If you love running, biking, skating, or any sort of active lifestyle – give yourself the gift of making time for it. That extra hour in the office, or that last minute meeting won’t really matter as much as you think it might. And there will come a day when your body won’t let you move like you do now. Make time for the mental and physical health you need to be the best performing leader you can.

Enjoy it on the YouTube video embedded below, or audio listeners can hear it on SoundCloud now too. We hope it enriches your Monday!

Kindly subscribe to the YouTube channel and SoundCloud to make sure you start your week with a leadership story.

Lorne Rubis is available @LorneRubis on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook.

Hot Topic Friday: May 17

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Happy Friday! Here are my May 17 Hot Topics and how they relate to advancing leadership or culture.

Hot Topic 1: New Long-Term Stock Exchange to Open in California

Source: Investopedia.

What it’s About: On May 10, 2019, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) granted approval for a new national securities exchange, the Long-Term Stock Exchange (LTSE). The LTSE (aka the Silicon Valley Stock Exchange), expects to begin accepting listings of companies and commencing trading sometime later in 2019. The exchange has high profile backers like venture capitalist, Marc Andreessen, who came to fame in the 1990’s as the co-developer of the pioneer browser, Netscape Navigator, and Eric Ries, who will be the CEO.

Why it’s Important: I’ve always believed that a CEO wringing his or her hands in quarterly increments is way more distracting than beneficial. Yes, businesses are expected to create sustainable value. However, short-term thinking can cause near-sighted, myopic decision making at the top of the house. A 2017 study by public policy think tank, Third Way, found that within five years after going public, the pressures to meet analysts’ short-term profit estimates leads to, on average, a 40 percent decline in patents; an indication that innovation momentum slows. Short-term focus can set you back. If you’re in the c-suite or board, keep your eye on this experiment and understand the implications for you. The long view is an important trend for the rest of us to be aware of.

Hot Topic 2: Adidas Will Sell 11 Million Ultra Cool Shoes Made of Plastic Waste.

Source: Goodnewsnetwork.org.

What it’s About: Adidas first started making the recycled shoes in collaboration with environmental group, Parley for the Oceans, in 2015. They developed the very cool kicks using plastic waste intercepted on beaches, before it can reach the oceans. The Parley shoes will reuse designs from the UltraBoost collection, and newer versions of Adidas Originals. They are as “hot” as these topics!

Why it’s Important: Before we are consumers, we are all citizens first. Many of us are looking beyond just a transaction. We want things that are hip, functional, available, and at value. Many of us will pay somewhat more when all four elements are achieved. The current plan, as I understand it, is to make the Parley originals out of recycled plastic and when they deteriorate, to grind and micro-manufacture your next pair out of the old pair; a continuous, local, personal supply chain. This is an example of how being purpose and value focused can drive innovation; maybe even market disruption.

My Weekly Wine Recommendation (Thanks to Vivino):

Checkered Lily Pinot Noir Anderson Valley California 2016.

[Picture and ratings provided by Vivino.]

And finally! Here’s Cecil’s Bleat of the Week!

“There is no innovation or creativity without failure.”Brené Brown

Bye for now!

– Lorne Rubis

Incase you missed it:

Monday’s Lead In podcast.

Tuesday’s blog.

Wednesday’s Culture Cast podcast.

Also don’t forget to subscribe to our site, and follow Lorne Rubis on Instagram, LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter for the latest from our podcasts, blogs, and all things offered on LorneRubis.com.

Culture Cast – What Your Dress Code Says About Your Work Culture

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In season 3, episode 15, Lorne and Lynette discuss the statement your clothing makes in your organizations. To what degree do you believe the formality of your attire impacts the way you accomplish work? What if your airplane pilot ditched their uniform for casual dress? Would it be off putting if a tech start up in 2019 required employees to dress in a suit and tie?

Take a little trip down memory lane with Lorne and Lynette as they discuss how dress codes and clothing expectations have evolved during their careers.

If you were starting up a company, what would you decide your dress code would be?

Please feel free to subscribe to this YouTube channel, follow this podcast on Soundcloud, as well as iTunes, and Lorne and Lynette’s social media platforms for all the latest Culture Cast uploads and announcements.

Lorne Rubis is available @LorneRubis on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook.

Lynette Turner is available on Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn as well as through her site, LynetteTurner.com.

We look forward to sharing Season 3 of Culture Cast: Conversations on Culture and Leadership with you every Wednesday.

Culture Nervousness in the Boardroom

Abundance Accountability Personal leadership Respect

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The Challenge: Boards of directors are responsible for the long term success of organizations. They are legally accountable to act reasonably and prudently to ensure the strategy is effective for the greater good of all stakeholders. Of course, this includes the performance of the CEO. Now, more than ever, they are asking CEOs to outline their culture strategy. There is much angst about the ability to address competitive adaptability and protect brand reputation. Most board meetings dip into serious culture questions. For example: How are we managing advancements in technology? Why did our engagement and/or Glassdoor score go down? Why did so and so leave? What is our ability to learn and unlearn fast? What’s all this hullabaloo about psychological safety? Do we need to refresh our purpose/values?

Management is no longer just being asked to report on the expected financial and customer metrics. Directors are asking a lot of questions about how to measure culture, too. Frankly it’s a squishy, messy word for many. How do you define it? How do you measure it? And most importantly, what kind of gameplan can you execute to improve it?

Story: I’m co-writing a book about culture. The following is the first draft of a McKinsey & Co. inspired paragraph, we might use on the jacket of the book: 

“Three books sit on more executives’ bookshelves than any others: ‘In Search of Excellence’ (1982), ‘Built to Last’ (1994), and ‘Good to Great’ (2001). They turned their authors into management gurus, especially Tom Peters (‘In Search of Excellence’) and Jim Collins (the other two titles). After all the hoopla, McKinsey found that over the long run, most companies touted in these books struggled to outperform the S&P 500. Many have disappeared altogether. The conclusion: respect the trend, do everything you can to get ahead of it. Do not be arrogant or numb to the fact that even the greatest companies of their time couldn’t hold back the tide. Many were victims of their belief in being invincible.” So here’s the deal: No company can wait, rest on its laurels and be satisfied with its culture. Improve and transform or get left in the dust.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Many of our readers are executives, C-suite members and board members. If you are in this group, you need a culture framework and gameplan. 
  2. Your culture strategy should embrace adaptation, innovation, disruption and transformation. If it doesn’t, it is incomplete at best. 
  3. Wherever you are in the company, your everyday behavior and thinking combines with every other employee to define the true culture. What’s your company culture?

Think Big, Start Small, Act Now.

Lorne

One Millennial View: Furthermore, if Millennials find themselves in an organization that lacks a company culture that they can be proud of, they should constantly be on the lookout for a position in an organization with purpose and values that fit their expectations. What better incentive for c-suite members to improve culture if all their employees decide to work elsewhere?  

– Garrett

Edited and published by Garrett Rubis

Lead In With Lorne – How Good Are You at Asking For Feedback?

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How good are you at asking for feedback after every meeting? Think about how often you truly ask employees for genuine feedback on a regular basis. It matters and sends the message that you’re interested in improving, learning and growing. No matter what you hear back, the only thing you need to reply with is “thank you.”

Enjoy it on the YouTube video embedded below, or audio listeners can hear it on SoundCloud now too. We hope it enriches your Monday!

Kindly subscribe to the YouTube channel and SoundCloud to make sure you start your week with a leadership story.

Lorne Rubis is available @LorneRubis on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook.